Barranco del Garbanzal and Picones de Fique

Barranco del Garbanzal and Picones de Fique


This trail is truly spectacular. It will take you through the area known as Pasada de Bosques, lying beneath the unusual petrified rock formations of the Picones de Fique and running along both sides of the Barranco del Garbanzal ravine before arriving at the ruins of the forest house, of which only a pile of rubble remains. The ruins are approximately 2 kilometres from the starting point and if you continue along the forest trail you will enter another, much wider and more open ravine known as the Extremara, bearing the same name as the stream that runs through it. Approximately 1.2 kilometres further on, you will reach another, crystal-clear watercourse, which is forded by the trail, and if you carry on walking upstream you will arrive at a spring thought to mark the source of the stream below.

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Belerda and Don Pedro

Belerda and Don Pedro


Belerda, or Las Belerdas, is very near to Casillas de Don Pedro, a town with which it has a strong social and historical relationship. Casillas de Don Pedro is situated beneath the series of natural and historical sites and shrines at Tíscar and is notable for the Picón Larguillo, a spectacular landform that defies gravity and welcomes visitors to the town. This group of hamlets, which are laid out in a delightfully haphazard fashion owing to the difficult topography and the varying social circumstances of its residents, was named in honour of Prince Peter, the uncle of Alfonso XI, who in 1319 captured the Moorish fortress of Tíscar and its 4500 inhabitants from the Moorish leader Mohamed Adón. The village spreads out on either side of the Tíscar stream at the bottom of the valley, at the foot of the range of hills known as the Cerros de Caballos. Protected by a natural rock face inhabited by vultures and Spanish ibex, Las Belerdas blends seamlessly into this wild and seemingly hostile environment.

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The Headwaters of the Guadalentín via Fuente Acero

The Headwaters of the Guadalentín via Fuente Acero


The course of the River Guadalentín has carved out a valley of immense beauty. The riverbanks are covered with lush vegetation: maples, ashes, poplars and gall oaks will line your route, while the river itself flows slowly through a series of crystal-clear pools that are home to otters and the native white-clawed crayfish, before quickening its pace through areas in which the banks narrow to form gorges. This is an indispensable excursion for anyone who wishes to become better acquainted with the Nature Park.

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Campos Hernán Perea

Campos Hernán Perea


Campos de Hernán Pelea (or Perea, as it is often spelled on many maps) is the largest high plateau in Spain, boasting an average altitude of 1600-1700 metres and covering an area of more than 5000 hectares. This vast plateau is one of the most magnificent and original landscapes in the Nature Park, clearly differentiated from all others.

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Cascada la Escaruela

Cascada la Escaruela


Looking out over the waterfall known as the Cascada de la Escaleruela, you will espy a charming little stream, covered with vegetation to such an extent that you will barely see the water flowing beneath it. Lifting your gaze upwards, between limestone rock-faces, you may spot a gushing torrent with numerous waterfalls that are only visible at times of heavy rain or during thaws. Although this spot is close to the populated areas of Cazorla and La Iruela, the wildness of the natural world makes its presence felt here in the form of this spectacular waterfall, which provides a taste of the sights to come as you head deeper into the park.

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Cerrada la Bolera

Cerrada la Bolera


Cerrada de la Bolera is one of the most spectacular and beautiful ravines in the park. From above, whether looking down from the dam at the reservoir of the same name, or from the A-326, on the bridge across the ravine, or from the viewing point at Peña de la Alcantarilla, the views are truly impressive. However, the most attractive surprises are to be found deep inside the ravine, an area reserved exclusively for those who practise canyoning. Water does not always flow through the ravine, however, as filtration during the driest parts of the year means that water often runs underground, leaving the sections above ground dry. Nonetheless, it is worth exploring the ravine to observe the attractive shapes that have been carved out by the river. And if the water levels in the reservoir are high, the aforementioned filtration process makes this excursion a dream.

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Cerrada de la Herradura and Cañada del Mesto

Cerrada de la Herradura and Cañada del Mesto


Depending on the water levels in the reservoir, the depth of the ravine of Cerrada de la Herradura varies. The best point from which to enjoy a panoramic view of the ravine is from the bridge which crosses it: the sense of security provided by the metal rail means you can lean out and look down at the trout and barbells thronging the crystalline waters of the River Guadalentín as it enters the Bolera reservoir.

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Cortados el Chorro

Cortados el Chorro


This steep cliff, situated just a few metres from the trail, is an ideal place for observing carrion birds such as griffon vultures and Egyptian vultures. Deep cracks which have formed in the limestone walls of this spectacular gorge are used by a wide variety of birds to nest in: mottled swifts, common kestrels and even peregrine falcons can be seen soaring ceaselessly above the Chorro stream, which is swelled by the meltwater running off the slopes of Gilillo and plunging fully 70 metres down into the ravine below.

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El Yelmo

El Yelmo


El Yelmo is the most popular and iconic mountain in the northern section of the park owing to the stunning views it boasts from its peak, which rises to an altitude of 1,809 metres. This eyrie offers an unrivalled view of the immense forests across the whole park, the distant mountain peaks in the province of Albacete and the wide plains of Castilla-La Mancha. A particular highlight is the bird’s-eye view of the picturesque towns of Hornos de Segura and Segura de la Sierra, amidst a harmonious lowland setting of forests and olive groves, along with the waters of the Tranco reservoir. El Yelmo is also an internationally renowned location for hang-gliding, with a launch point that boasts the ideal conditions for practising this sport.

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Aguas Negras Reservoir and Lake Valdeazores

Aguas Negras Reservoir and Lake Valdeazores


Although the natural beauty and richness of these two areas has resulted in a countless number of day-trippers coming to visit them in recent decades, they have managed to preserve their uniqueness and splendour. They are located in one of the most heavily protected areas of the park owing to the extremely delicate nature of their ecosystems, a delicacy which has resulted in a veritable explosion of biodiversity: mallards, coots and robins are just some of the many birds which have found ideal homes in these bodies of water and the vegetation which surrounds them.

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Anchuricas Reservoir

Anchuricas Reservoir


This small reservoir, sandwiched between dense pine forests and high mountains, is a delightful surprise for visitors because the water level is normally high and it actually looks like a narrow lake. Water flows in from the River Segura, once it leaves La Toba, and continues for 4 to 5 kilometres up to the dam. Depending on the amount of sunlight present, the water in the reservoir can take on a range of different aspects from an intense blue to an emerald green, which only adds to the mysteries already lurking beneath its surface.

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La Bolera Reservoir

La Bolera Reservoir


The Bolera Reservoir calms the crystal-clear waters of the River Guadalentin, forming a 6-kilometre-long artificial lake. In summer, it is an ideal place to enjoy a refreshing swim. There is a special area for bathers on the left bank of the reservoir, near the restaurant, which forms a balcony and viewpoint overlooking the dam. You can also go canoeing on the reservoir’s calm waters. There are several companies in the area that organise water sports activities. The abundance of fish-eating birds is the result of the variety and quantity of fish found in these waters today, which include brown trout, rainbow trout, carp, barbel, chub, gudgeon and loach. This enticing food source also attracts otters, which can often be seen entering and leaving the water on the banks of the reservoir.

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Tranco Reservoir

Tranco Reservoir


The Tranco is one of the largest reservoirs in Spain, and as it also numbers among the park's leading landscape features the reservoir and surrounding area – known as the Bujaraiza Reserve Area - enjoy special levels of protection. The A-319 road runs along the left-hand side of the reservoir, where there are a number of viewing points, recreation areas, signposted paths and different accommodation options and restaurants, in addition to facilities for watersports. The right-hand side of the reservoir is for the most part criss-crossed by forest tracks and trails, while the start of the reservoir (the area towards the south) has several viewing points which form part of the Félix Rodriguez de la Fuente Route.

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La Vieja Reservoir

La Vieja Reservoir


The lush slopes and rock faces are reflected in the blue-green waters of this tiny reservoir, which resembles a natural, high-mountain lake more than it does a man-made feature. La Vieja is formed by the waters of the River Zumeta, and is a serene, tranquil spot that is the perfect place to savour a moment of peace and quiet.

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Estrecho los Perales

Estrecho los Perales


This remarkable gorge is renowned for its intriguing rock formations, while at its bottom the Valdetrillos stream rushes through a series of energetic rapids, adding its exuberant soundtrack to the landscape. Here it is easy to observe how the agile mouflon and spritely Spanish ibex make their way across the vertical rock faces, and you may even be treated to the majestic sight of golden eagles, booted eagles and griffon vultures soaring high above. At the end section of Calarillas Valley you can take in a view of the highest mountains in the park.

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