Places for animal watching

Places for animal watching


BIRD-WATCHING TRAILS

There are ten Bird-Watching Trails in and around the south area of the Nature Reserve. They are easy to access and have stunningly beautiful landscapes. At the entrance you will find an information panel giving full details of the area, the bird species you can watch and the itinerary.

Here are some of the trails you can follow and the most interesting species you can find on each trail:

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Pyrenean oak groves

Pyrenean oak groves


Cañada de Poyo Torres

As soon as you get out of the car, you are in the middle of a dense, dark Pyrenean oak (Quercus Pyrenaica) grove. This grove is one of the most demanding ecosystems in terms of soil quality, soil depth and moisture. There are very few Pyrenean oak groves in the Nature Reserve and they can only be found in a few places in the Segura mountains. This is one of the most important and interesting forests in the Reserve, with a host of plant species growing in it.

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Collado del Almendral Wildlife Park

Collado del Almendral Wildlife Park


Wild hoofed animal species are one of the main attractions in these mountains and they are within your reach in the Wildlife Park. Admission is free. Red deer, mountain goats, fallow deer and mouflon graze in relative freedom within the Park. You can observe and photograph them while taking a pleasant stroll along a route that includes fountains, benches and several viewpoints affording wonderful panoramas of the Tranco reservoir and the ruins of the Bujaraiza castle. The Wildlife Park has a bar.

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Corsican pine forests

Corsican pine forests


Puerto Llano

The Corsican pine wood is one of the Nature Reserve’s botanical and scenic gems. The plant formation we are about to describe is considered indigenous to these mountains, since they only grow on the Reserve’s alpine slopes. It is a good idea not to be in a hurry when you set out to stroll through the indigenous pine wood in Puerto Llano. Most of the pines here are over 600 years old.

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Aleppo pine forest

Aleppo pine forest


Bucentaina

This appealing forest track runs through an Aleppo pine with a dense undergrowth of oaks, strawberry trees and laurustinus. Just as you come in sight of the village of Puentehonda, you can see two huge venerable Aleppo pines right next to the track. They are included in the Inventory of Unique Andalusian Trees under the names of Barrancos de Puentehonda Pine and Cerro Bucentaina Pine, respectively. The latter stands 32 m tall and measures 4.5 m in diameter at the base.

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Gall oak and oak forests

Gall oak and oak forests


Environs of Guadalentín Canyon

The descent into the Guadalentín canyon goes through one of the best gall oak forests in the Nature Reserve. The majestic peaks of Poyos de la Carilarga rise up on the other side of the canyon, surrounded by gall oaks. This walk through the oak forest, close to the river and the rocky outcrops, is a wonderful way to enjoy nature in this area.

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Black juniper forests

Black juniper forests


Lancha del Lobo and river Zumeta

The black juniper or simply juniper (Juniperus phoenicea) forest is one of the characteristic plant formations in the Nature Reserve. They owe their importance to their extension, habitat – rocks and dolomite sandbanks – and to the large number of indigenous species that live in them, including the most emblematic species of all, the Cazorla violet (Viola cazarlensis) and Jasione crispa segurensis, endemisms of the Segura mountains. The juniper forest is listed as a natural habitat of Community interest in the Natura 2000 network.

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Juniper and savin juniper forests

Juniper and savin juniper forests


Campos de Hernán Pelea

We cannot talk about the high mountains, the summits, rocky slopes and ridges, without mentioning the most emblematic species that live there: the savin juniper (Juniperus sabina) and common junipers (Juniperus comunnis hemisphaerica), veritable hallmarks of our mountains that would deserve the name of The Ancient Ones of the Summits. These are the plants that cover the summits in a dark green mantle and afford shelter to an infinite number of animals.

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